Shouldn’t Detection Rates Dictate Public Education?


Ovarian Cancer stages of diagnoses.

Ovarian cancer. Stages at diagnosis from cancer.gov. Obviously detecting any cancer at an early stage is far better than at a later stage.

According to cancer.gov, breast cancer is far more common than ovarian cancer,  yet the stage at which breast cancer is detected is far earlier.

61% of ovarian cancer patients are not diagnosed until the cancer has spread into other areas, compared to 60% of breast cancer diagnoses which occur in the earliest stages of the disease.

I don’t buy that a disease’s rate of occurrence should fuel the amount of attention given to it.

Unless I’m reading this wrong, the site also reports that

On January 1, 2009, in the United States there were approximately 182,758 women alive who had a history of cancer of the ovary. This includes any person alive on January 1, 2009 who had been diagnosed with cancer of the ovary at any point prior to January 1, 2009 and includes persons with active disease and those who are cured of their disease.

versus

On January 1, 2009, in the United States there were approximately 2,747,459 women alive who had a history of cancer of the breast. This includes any person alive on January 1, 2009 who had been diagnosed with cancer of the breast at any point prior to January 1, 2009 and includes persons with active disease and those who are cured of their disease.

Read: Those who are cured of their disease.

Need I say more?

Please help spread the word – numbers do not lie.